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The Fair O'Blair

Read about the history of Blairgowie.

25–29 Allan Street, Blairgowrie, Perth and Kinross, PH10 6AB
The Wellmeadow is the centrepiece of the town, with the grassy triangular plot hosting regular markets and outdoor entertainments. There were once several springs or wells here, where the 4th-century missionary St Ninian is said to have camped with a party of followers. The practice of holding fairs and markets here began in 1824, including the famous Fair o’Blair, which was staged annually in July for many years.

A plaque documenting the history of The Fair O’Blair.

 

The plaque reads: These licensed premises were built in the 1960s as a branch of the Woolworths chain (store number 1098), which ceased trading in December 2008. The premises front onto Allan street, named after Colonel Allan Macpherson, who was the superior of the town in 1800, and are named after the famous fair, held annually in July, on the Wellmeadow at the foot of the street. The practice of holding fairs and markets on the Wellmeadow began in 1824.

These premises were refurbished by J D Wetherspoon in May 2013.

A print and text about Muckle Mill.


The text reads: Muckle Mill was the first mill to be built in the late 18th century. By 1870 there were 12 water-powered mills along the banks of the Ericht employing 2,000 people.

A print and text about the mills.


The text reads: Eight of the twelve mills were turning flax into linen and jute and the rest processed jute, transforming Blairgowie from a rural village of handloom weavers into an industrial town.

A print and text about the Wellmeadow.


The text reads: The Wellmeadow is the centre piece of the town. Situated at the foot of Alban Street, the grassy triangular plot hosts regular markets and outdoor entertainments. There were once several springs or wells here, where the fourth century missionary St Ninian is said to have camped with a party of followers. 

A photograph and text about the local Tug O’War contest. 


The text reads: In 1988 it was decided to have an open Tug O’War contest at the Blairgowie and Rattray Highland Games to reflect the friendly rivalry that exists between the two communities on either side of Ericht. During the first contest the two ropes that had been tied together came apart under the strain of around 100 contestants, causing minor injuries to the tuggers in the forefront of the Blairgowie team. A new rope, both longer and stronger was donated by Sir Alistair Grant, Chairman of the Argyll Group. The contest has since been without incident.

External photograph of the building – main entrance.


If you have information on the history of this pub, then we’d like you to share it with us. Please e-mail all information to: pubhistories@jdwetherspoon.co.uk